Quality Resource: CCBlogC

This is not the first time I’ve referenced the CCBC (Cooperative Children’s Book Center), nor will it be the last; however, this is the first time I’m highlighting CCBlogC. The CCBlogC is a blog showcasing “Observations about books for children and teens from the Cooperative Children’s Book Center.” It is hosted by the CCBC librarians and is filled with reviews of newly released literature. Check it out if you’re looking to stay informed about great books that have recently been published. The latest book-of-the-week highlights The Lost Kitten, a picture book; meanwhile, a recent favorite of mine they highlighted the first week of August was The First Rule of Punk, a book for the middle grades (ages 9-12). Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

When you realize classic books are racist

PBS recently aired a clip of Grace Lin talking about: What to do when you realize classic books from your childhood are racist  There are SO many books that fall into this category and many times people don’t even think about it because the book is so familiar and beloved to them. Next time you’re reading books from your childhood, or even earlier in time, take a critical eye and evaluate the words AND illustrations contained within the story. You have the freedom to read what you choose. Please, please, take the time to discuss the topics within these classic stories with the people in your life. If you’re interested in more resources of how to talk about these issues please email me, happy reading! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

Quality Resource: American Indians in Children’s Literature

American Indians in Children’s Literature is a blog that is maintained by the amazing Debbie Reese. Her site is full of highly useful information regarding children’s literature that is by or about American Indians. She started the blog in 2006 and since then has become a go-to source for many librarians and educators when it comes to the evaluation of books including American Indians (or representations of sovereign nations and peoples). Some highlights of the resources you will find while visiting AICL include: Best Books Native Writers, Illustrators, Scholars, Activists…on Twitter Revisions to Racism in Books Books that Reference Racist Classics Plus, I even made her blog back in 2013 thanks to Debbie video-chatting with our Tribal Libraries, Archives, and Museums (TLAM) class at the Information School @ the University of Wisconsin – Madison with the post, Indigenous Knowledge and Children’s Literature. Have a wonderful day and happy reading! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

Quality Resource: The Climate Reality Project

The Climate Reality Project began in 2006 when, “Nobel Laureate and former US Vice President Al Gore got the world talking about climate change with the Academy Award-winning film An Inconvenient Truth. It was just the beginning of a climate revolution, and later that year, he founded The Climate Reality Project to move the conversation forward and turn awareness into action. The Climate Reality Project is a diverse group of passionate individuals who have come together to solve the greatest challenge of our time. We are cultural leaders, organizers, scientists, and storytellers, and we are committed to building a better future together.” The mission: To catalyze a global solution to the climate crisis by making urgent action a necessity across every level of society. The wonderful part about this project is that it completely relies on you, and me! The resources available will assist you in learning what you need to know in order to go out and education your friends, neighbors, classmates, colleagues, elected officials, and anyone else you’re approaching. You can download the “Truth in Ten” slideshow as well as the “Make it a Reality: Action Kit” at: https://www.climaterealityproject.org/  Finally, I’ll have a learning guide ready focused on […]

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power

Last weekend I was able to watch An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power complete with a panel afterwards that even included Al Gore himself! I appreciated the story grounded in truth, hope, and possibility, as well as the cinematography of the film itself. We all need to fight like our world depends on it, because it does. Though this documentary is a follow-up to the 2006 An Inconvenient Truth, it is its own story. As in, the prior film is not required viewing before watching this latest installment; however, I would of course recommend both of them to see what has happened in just the last 10 years. In terms of learning… Pairing An Inconvenient Sequel (2017) with Before the Flood (2016) would make for some amazing discussions and creative future planning within any middle school, high school, or adult learning group. Both of these documentaries have wonderful resources via their websites (linked below). In addition, I’m working on a learning guide that will incorporate both films that should be ready soon! Please email me if you’re interested in its progress. Check out these website resources to learn more about our climate and what you can do: Climate Reality Project (An Inconvenient Sequel) – https://www.climaterealityproject.org/  Before the Flood […]