The March Against Fear

Ann Bausum has written another excellent piece of literature with her text: The March Against Fear: The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power It’s a compelling read informing readers about James Meredith and the March Against Fear. Kirkus has a wonderful review if you’re interested in reading more about the text.  This post was written to highlight the PBA (performance-based assessment / project-based assessment) I’ve created to accompany the text and it is accessible to you via the link below! The PBA includes three options for use: 1. A menu in which students choose three projects to make a tic-tac-toe. 2. Two lists requiring students to choose one project from each of the lists. 3. One list of projects requiring students to choose one to complete. The March Against Fear PBA In addition, there are some excellent resources to accompany the text including: Publisher Learning Guide Classroom Suggestions from the Author James Meredith and the March Against Fear National Archives Documents The Visual Imprint of James Meredith by The Black Film Center / Archive The Bob Fitch Photography Archive via Stanford Libraries Please comment on this post or message me if you’ve […]

Quality Resource: Bat Conservation International

Disclaimer: I love bats! That said, I wanted to share a great organization (that has some awesome gifts if you’re looking to “adopt a bat” this holiday season). Bat Conservation International works on every continent bats live. It also has a variety of online, quality resources to get your students interested in bats. To learn more about what they’re up to just check out the links below: Bat Conservation International Bat Masks Kidz Cave Handouts Prevent Extinctions Enjoy and have fun learning more about an animal I truly love, bats! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

Bravo! Poems About Amazing Hispanics

A quick post today to share a book review of Bravo! Poems About Amazing Hispanics Read the entire review at CCBlogC and follow what the Cooperative Children’s Book Center is up to on their website. Thanks for your support! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

Treaty Rights and Sovereignty with Walter Bresette

Are you familiar with treaty rights and the concept of sovereignty? Take a few minutes (four to be exact) to learn more through the words of Walter Bresette (courtesy of the Wisconsin Media Lab):     Explore the site to find print and web resources along with additional biographical information and activities. Not only can you learn about Walter Bresette but you can also learn about Stephen Babcock, Elizabeth Baird, Mildred Fish-Harnack, Les Paul, Chief Oshkosh, Joshua Glover, Belle La Follette, Harley-Davidson, Kate Newcomb, and Phillips-Groppi. Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

Learning about Proverbs

A few years ago I created door displays for each of my library’s entrances. One of the entrances featured proverbs. Proverbs Door Display Proverbs are included within so many stories and conversational language yet many students (especially elementary aged) are unfamiliar with their meanings. Therefore, I utilized the Core Knowledge curriculum to make a display that incorporated all 91 proverbs within their list. In order to further support student learning in and outside of the library I decided to create proverb bookmarks to expand on this display! Examples… Not only do these bookmarks work great within a station but they are easily incorporated into classroom learning as well. I’m sure there are numerous other uses for them however I have included four project ideas to use with them including writing a persuasive essay, writing a short story, completing a research project (poster, essay, or comic), and simply using them for their original idea, independent learning and coloring. As a thank you for reading, they are free to download via the links below. However, if you are willing and able, I have links at the bottom both for the listing on TeachersPayTeachers and to donate directly to Circulating Knowledge. Proverb Project […]

Quality Resource: Digital Literacy Lessons Courtesy of Teaching Tolerance

This is not the first time I’ve mentioned Teaching Tolerance nor will it be the last, they are full of amazing resources! Today’s quality resource is their suite of Digital Literacy lessons. These are continuously expanding however they’re already off to a great start! I learned about their Digital Literacy Lessons after participating in their webinar, Teaching Digital Literacy. This webinar not only provided great information but also a list of useful links that I felt were worth sharing here: Speaking of Digital Literacy…Understanding how the brain processes information can help students unravel the origins of fake news and other mysteries of the internet. Published in Issue 57, Fall 2017, of Teaching Tolerance, article by Kate Shuster The Debunking Handbook by John Cook and Stephan Lewandowsky, first published in November 2011 5-Minute Film Festival: 9 Videos on News Literacy by Edutopia, published on September 25, 2015 A Field Guide to Fake News, a project of the Public Data Lab with support from First Draft Evaluating Sources in a ‘Post-Truth’ World: Ideas for Teaching and Learning About Fake News by Katherine Schulten & Amanda Christy Brown, published on NYTimes, January 19, 2017 How Fake News Goes Viral: A Case Study by Sapna […]

Library Maps

At your library, do you have a map of the space? If so, how do you use it and what has the response been? Here’s mine, imperfections and all!   Because I had reorganized the entire space and collection, I decided to create a map to serve two purposes. To get students and teachers familiar with the library. To increase the map skills of the students. For the first part, I went over the map with classrooms and had it posted around the library. I also had a stack available at the desk in case anyone was interested in obtaining a copy. For the second… At our school, there were a significant amount of students with little to no abilities in reading a map. This was surprising and concerning. Therefore, I figured why not make this learning part of their time at the library. Every little bit helps and because it was such a challenging activity I made it into a game. Students were paired into groups (by their teacher in order to account for their skills in this area) and they were tasked with using the map to complete a series of questions. Each student had a role so […]

Quality Resource: PBS Learning Media

Are you looking for a free online platform designed to improve not only your effectiveness as a teacher but also the achievement of your students? Check out: PBS Learning Media As the site states, “PBS LearningMedia provides PreK-12 educators with access to free digital content and professional development opportunities designed to improve teacher effectiveness and student achievement. PBS LearningMedia was developed in partnership with the WGBH Educational Foundation and is offered locally by 155 PBS licensees, representing 356 stations in 55 U.S. states and territories.” Some of my favorite finds thus far: Waadookodaading: Ojibwe Language Immersion School (checkout theways.org for more videos like this one) What’s the Deal with Fossil Fuels?  Earth Days: Rachel Carson & Silent Spring Happy exploring and happy learning! Your Librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

What Teachers Need to Know About the “Alt-Right”

Looking to learn more about the “Alt-Right”? Teaching Tolerance held a webinar recently that is excellent for those of you trying to get a grasp of what the “alt-right’ is as well as what you can be doing in your classroom in regards to this group. You can access the webinar via the Teaching Tolerance website at: What Teachers Need to Know about the “Alt-Right” As a bonus, you do get a certificate to print out certifying your participation. Ask your administration in advance if it can count toward your continuing education credits. In addition, before attending to the webinar, I would highly recommend reading: What is the “Alt-Right”?: White nationalism has come out of the basement and entered the mainstream. Would you recognize it if it came to your classroom? (Issue 57, Fall 2017) By Cory Collins This is the article that spurred the creation of the webinar and is highly useful information going into your learning session. The webinar will also give you all the additional resources but I have linked them here as well: Examining Your School’s Climate Shifting Out of Neutral: A history teacher leaves the struggle for objectivity behind. (Issue 52, Spring 2016) By Jonathan Gold 20 Face to Face […]

Quality Resource: TED Radio Hour

Do you listen to NPR? Have you listened to the TED Radio Hour? Have your students? Well, this program (along with many, many others) make for a great addition to middle and high school classrooms. If you’re looking for a new homeroom activity, one focusing on current events, or many other topics. Check out the website for archived audio. Then, use the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) website if you want to watch an entire TED talk. Students, just like you, love listening to stories and learning from others (especially when they are experts in their fields). Just make sure to listen to the content first before sharing! For one of my recent favorite episodes, check out: Rethinking School Happy listening! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez