Winter Break Bingo!

Teachers, Librarians, & Administrators (of elementary students), Are you looking for a fun way to promote reading and writing this winter break? Check out: Winter Break Bingo Simply print, discuss, and pass out to your students. There is an optional second page with the prompt of “Draw a picture of yourself reading.” Encourage your students to complete as many boxes as they can and return it after winter break so they can share everything they were up to. If they need an incentive, go for it; and, if you’re looking for personalization, message me! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez Per usual, this resource is also available on TeachersPayTeachers and please let me know how it went over!

The March Against Fear

Ann Bausum has written another excellent piece of literature with her text: The March Against Fear: The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power It’s a compelling read informing readers about James Meredith and the March Against Fear. Kirkus has a wonderful review if you’re interested in reading more about the text.  This post was written to highlight the PBA (performance-based assessment / project-based assessment) I’ve created to accompany the text and it is accessible to you via the link below! The PBA includes three options for use: 1. A menu in which students choose three projects to make a tic-tac-toe. 2. Two lists requiring students to choose one project from each of the lists. 3. One list of projects requiring students to choose one to complete. The March Against Fear PBA In addition, there are some excellent resources to accompany the text including: Publisher Learning Guide Classroom Suggestions from the Author James Meredith and the March Against Fear National Archives Documents The Visual Imprint of James Meredith by The Black Film Center / Archive The Bob Fitch Photography Archive via Stanford Libraries Please comment on this post or message me if you’ve […]

Holiday Bookmarks

Happy Holidays! I know it’s a little early but I had to get these out for all of you who are interested in obtaining holiday bookmarks ready to be colored. All images contained within the PDF download can be viewed below. As you will notice, most of the bookmarks are themed around winter or Christmas though there are a few to celebrate Hanukkah! Plus, there’s an additional page for all occasions: Holiday Bookmarks Thank you for reading, happy holidays (in advance)! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez If you’re able and willing, you can support Circulating Knowledge and the creation of free resources by donating via the link below: This resource can also be found on TeachersPayTeachers.

Treaty Rights and Sovereignty with Walter Bresette

Are you familiar with treaty rights and the concept of sovereignty? Take a few minutes (four to be exact) to learn more through the words of Walter Bresette (courtesy of the Wisconsin Media Lab):     Explore the site to find print and web resources along with additional biographical information and activities. Not only can you learn about Walter Bresette but you can also learn about Stephen Babcock, Elizabeth Baird, Mildred Fish-Harnack, Les Paul, Chief Oshkosh, Joshua Glover, Belle La Follette, Harley-Davidson, Kate Newcomb, and Phillips-Groppi. Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

Learning about Proverbs

A few years ago I created door displays for each of my library’s entrances. One of the entrances featured proverbs. Proverbs Door Display Proverbs are included within so many stories and conversational language yet many students (especially elementary aged) are unfamiliar with their meanings. Therefore, I utilized the Core Knowledge curriculum to make a display that incorporated all 91 proverbs within their list. In order to further support student learning in and outside of the library I decided to create proverb bookmarks to expand on this display! Examples… Not only do these bookmarks work great within a station but they are easily incorporated into classroom learning as well. I’m sure there are numerous other uses for them however I have included four project ideas to use with them including writing a persuasive essay, writing a short story, completing a research project (poster, essay, or comic), and simply using them for their original idea, independent learning and coloring. As a thank you for reading, they are free to download via the links below. However, if you are willing and able, I have links at the bottom both for the listing on TeachersPayTeachers and to donate directly to Circulating Knowledge. Proverb Project […]

Library Maps

At your library, do you have a map of the space? If so, how do you use it and what has the response been? Here’s mine, imperfections and all!   Because I had reorganized the entire space and collection, I decided to create a map to serve two purposes. To get students and teachers familiar with the library. To increase the map skills of the students. For the first part, I went over the map with classrooms and had it posted around the library. I also had a stack available at the desk in case anyone was interested in obtaining a copy. For the second… At our school, there were a significant amount of students with little to no abilities in reading a map. This was surprising and concerning. Therefore, I figured why not make this learning part of their time at the library. Every little bit helps and because it was such a challenging activity I made it into a game. Students were paired into groups (by their teacher in order to account for their skills in this area) and they were tasked with using the map to complete a series of questions. Each student had a role so […]

Topical / Thematic Checkout & Book Memory

Hello! I hope you’re having a wonderful day. I’m excited to share a resource with you’ve I’ve made to help solve the situation of…   …Students are familiar with the library and have been checking out materials for a few months. They even check out their items with the same group of friend. While this is not a problem, there are times when it’s good to be pushed outside of comfort zones. The library is a great place for this. Therefore… Topical / Thematic Checkout (let me know if you come up with a better title for this) Basically… The amount of cards necessary will depend on the amount of students per class. I get my stacks ready the day before (or have a student do it) and binder clip them onto that classroom’s clipboard so it’s all ready to go. To account for classes larger than 24 I simply print 2 sets with the same book as the opposite side. When it’s time for students to checkout you hand a card to each student and use something similar to the directions I’ve included below. The cards are collected as students checkout their items. No card = no checkout (so […]

At-Home Activities for Families with Preschoolers

Now that I’ve got two sets of activities ready to go, I’m ready to tell you about them! I’ve been working with a preschool teacher to come up with fun, age-appropriate activities to accompany her weekly newsletters. She wanted something that was only one page so it could be copied onto the back of her one-page newsletter. The first set includes 14 activities and the second includes 12 activities. This means that downloading both will give you a total of 26 activities to send home with your students (if you’re in a school), patrons (if you’re in a library), or children if you’ll be using these at home yourself. The activities provide a platform to count, talk, write, draw, color, name, give, and story-tell together. My organizational advice… print them all and keep them in a binder (inside those clear sheet protectors). Stick a post-it onto the front of the protector to write the date it was used. This will not only help you in deciding what activity to use next but well also assist in reprinting for a caregiver.As a thank you for following Circulating Knowledge and reading this post, all activities are available to be downloaded for free […]

Balderdash! John Newbery and the Boisterious Birth of Children’s Books

Balderdash! John Newbery and the Boisterous Birth of Children’s Books Bringing you back to the 1700s, Balderdash! illuminates the life of John Newbery. John was a boy growing up in an England without children’s literature, or at least not children’s literature as we know it today. Written by Michelle Markel and illustrated by Nancy Carpenter, this is a book that held up to its expectations. It will keep you entertained while also providing you with a healthy amount of new vocabulary, information about book printing in the mid-1700s, and beautiful illustrations to keep your eyes entertained. Check it out at your local library! I was especially fond of the marbling in the end pages for giving a nod to classic book printing. This is a book that would fit in well with any elementary classroom learning about the John Newbery award, the history of books, or simply wanting an enjoyable, quality picture book to lay their eyes on. Best of all, after the story there is a history of John Newbery, additional information about the books mentioned in the book, and a bibliography including suggested further reading. While I would read this book to any elementary-aged students, it would be especially fun […]

Teaching about Black Lives Matter

Following up on the previous post about The Hate U Give and text complexity, I wanted to share a few resources I recently came across thanks to Teaching Tolerance. The first gives a history of the beginning, information on the hashtag, myths, criticisms, and a perspective on “All Lives Matter.” The second article gives elementary applications, middle school approaches, and teaching about Black Lives Matter in a High School. But enough of me telling you…read them for yourselves and share with anyone and everyone who may benefit from them: Why Teaching Black Lives Matter Matters: Part 1 (Issue 56, Summer 2017, by Jamilah Pitts) An excerpt from Why Teaching Black Lives Matter Matters: “Not all of us are like Thompson; the students who sit in front of us daily are not always directly affected by the killing of unarmed black people or any of the other injustices that plague our nation. But as teachers who function as caretakers, truth-seekers and advocates of justice, we can acknowledge how the threat of justice in one community is, to borrow from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a threat to justice in every community. We have a civic responsibility to be educated about Black Lives Matter and, as […]