Quality Resource: Bat Conservation International

Disclaimer: I love bats! That said, I wanted to share a great organization (that has some awesome gifts if you’re looking to “adopt a bat” this holiday season). Bat Conservation International works on every continent bats live. It also has a variety of online, quality resources to get your students interested in bats. To learn more about what they’re up to just check out the links below: Bat Conservation International Bat Masks Kidz Cave Handouts Prevent Extinctions Enjoy and have fun learning more about an animal I truly love, bats! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

Quality Resource: Digital Literacy Lessons Courtesy of Teaching Tolerance

This is not the first time I’ve mentioned Teaching Tolerance nor will it be the last, they are full of amazing resources! Today’s quality resource is their suite of Digital Literacy lessons. These are continuously expanding however they’re already off to a great start! I learned about their Digital Literacy Lessons after participating in their webinar, Teaching Digital Literacy. This webinar not only provided great information but also a list of useful links that I felt were worth sharing here: Speaking of Digital Literacy…Understanding how the brain processes information can help students unravel the origins of fake news and other mysteries of the internet. Published in Issue 57, Fall 2017, of Teaching Tolerance, article by Kate Shuster The Debunking Handbook by John Cook and Stephan Lewandowsky, first published in November 2011 5-Minute Film Festival: 9 Videos on News Literacy by Edutopia, published on September 25, 2015 A Field Guide to Fake News, a project of the Public Data Lab with support from First Draft Evaluating Sources in a ‘Post-Truth’ World: Ideas for Teaching and Learning About Fake News by Katherine Schulten & Amanda Christy Brown, published on NYTimes, January 19, 2017 How Fake News Goes Viral: A Case Study by Sapna […]

Quality Resource: PBS Learning Media

Are you looking for a free online platform designed to improve not only your effectiveness as a teacher but also the achievement of your students? Check out: PBS Learning Media As the site states, “PBS LearningMedia provides PreK-12 educators with access to free digital content and professional development opportunities designed to improve teacher effectiveness and student achievement. PBS LearningMedia was developed in partnership with the WGBH Educational Foundation and is offered locally by 155 PBS licensees, representing 356 stations in 55 U.S. states and territories.” Some of my favorite finds thus far: Waadookodaading: Ojibwe Language Immersion School (checkout theways.org for more videos like this one) What’s the Deal with Fossil Fuels?  Earth Days: Rachel Carson & Silent Spring Happy exploring and happy learning! Your Librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

What Teachers Need to Know About the “Alt-Right”

Looking to learn more about the “Alt-Right”? Teaching Tolerance held a webinar recently that is excellent for those of you trying to get a grasp of what the “alt-right’ is as well as what you can be doing in your classroom in regards to this group. You can access the webinar via the Teaching Tolerance website at: What Teachers Need to Know about the “Alt-Right” As a bonus, you do get a certificate to print out certifying your participation. Ask your administration in advance if it can count toward your continuing education credits. In addition, before attending to the webinar, I would highly recommend reading: What is the “Alt-Right”?: White nationalism has come out of the basement and entered the mainstream. Would you recognize it if it came to your classroom? (Issue 57, Fall 2017) By Cory Collins This is the article that spurred the creation of the webinar and is highly useful information going into your learning session. The webinar will also give you all the additional resources but I have linked them here as well: Examining Your School’s Climate Shifting Out of Neutral: A history teacher leaves the struggle for objectivity behind. (Issue 52, Spring 2016) By Jonathan Gold 20 Face to Face […]

Quality Resource: TED Radio Hour

Do you listen to NPR? Have you listened to the TED Radio Hour? Have your students? Well, this program (along with many, many others) make for a great addition to middle and high school classrooms. If you’re looking for a new homeroom activity, one focusing on current events, or many other topics. Check out the website for archived audio. Then, use the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) website if you want to watch an entire TED talk. Students, just like you, love listening to stories and learning from others (especially when they are experts in their fields). Just make sure to listen to the content first before sharing! For one of my recent favorite episodes, check out: Rethinking School Happy listening! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

Quality Resource: Book Discussion Guidelines

I’ve posted about the Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC) in the past but want to highlight a specific resource available on their website. The CCBC Book Discussion Guidelines:  CCBC Book Discussion Guidelines Ginny Moore Kruse and Kathleen T. Horning © 1989 Cooperative Children’s Book Center Look at each book for what it is, rather than what it is not. Make positive comments first. Try to express what you liked about the book and why. (e.g. “The illustrations are a perfect match for the story because….”) After everyone has had the opportunity to say what they appreciated about the book, you may talk about difficulties you had with a particular aspect of the book. Try to express difficulties as questions, rather than declarative judgments on the book as a whole. (e.g. “Would Max’s dinner really have still been warm?” rather than “That would never happen.”) Avoid recapping the story or booktalking the book. There is not time for a summary. Refrain from relating personal anecdotes. The discussion must focus on the book at hand. Try to compare the book with others on the discussion list, rather than other books by the same author or other books in your experience. All perspectives and vocabularies are correct. There […]

Teaching about Black Lives Matter

Following up on the previous post about The Hate U Give and text complexity, I wanted to share a few resources I recently came across thanks to Teaching Tolerance. The first gives a history of the beginning, information on the hashtag, myths, criticisms, and a perspective on “All Lives Matter.” The second article gives elementary applications, middle school approaches, and teaching about Black Lives Matter in a High School. But enough of me telling you…read them for yourselves and share with anyone and everyone who may benefit from them: Why Teaching Black Lives Matter Matters: Part 1 (Issue 56, Summer 2017, by Jamilah Pitts) An excerpt from Why Teaching Black Lives Matter Matters: “Not all of us are like Thompson; the students who sit in front of us daily are not always directly affected by the killing of unarmed black people or any of the other injustices that plague our nation. But as teachers who function as caretakers, truth-seekers and advocates of justice, we can acknowledge how the threat of justice in one community is, to borrow from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a threat to justice in every community. We have a civic responsibility to be educated about Black Lives Matter and, as […]

The Hate U Give

Ever since I finished The Hate U Give, I’ve been meaning to write a post about it. This is an important novel recommended for 8th graders through adults. The Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas, is a complex, relevant novel about 16-year-old Starr Carter who is living in two worlds…her home neighborhood of Garden Heights (mostly Black) and her school neighborhood at Williamson Prep (mostly White). Mimicking contemporary society, Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of unarmed Khalil, her childhood friend, by a white police officer. The media explodes however both the police and journalists lack the information necessary to give an honest portrayal of Khalil. Starr needs to decide if and how she will stand up against the systemic racism present in her life. Grounded in family, friendship, reality, humor, and enjoyable nods to Harry Potter, Angie Thomas gives readers an intimate look into an all-too-familiar reality for far-too-many Americans. Read the book and check out a few interviews with the author: NPR Interview School Library Journal Interview HarperStacks Interview The Booklist Reader After reading, I used TeachingBooks to see the Lexile level and what other resources were available to connect to the text. It may or may not surprise you to learn […]

Quality Resource: CCBlogC

This is not the first time I’ve referenced the CCBC (Cooperative Children’s Book Center), nor will it be the last; however, this is the first time I’m highlighting CCBlogC. The CCBlogC is a blog showcasing “Observations about books for children and teens from the Cooperative Children’s Book Center.” It is hosted by the CCBC librarians and is filled with reviews of newly released literature. Check it out if you’re looking to stay informed about great books that have recently been published. The latest book-of-the-week highlights The Lost Kitten, a picture book; meanwhile, a recent favorite of mine they highlighted the first week of August was The First Rule of Punk, a book for the middle grades (ages 9-12). Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez

Quality Resource: American Indians in Children’s Literature

American Indians in Children’s Literature is a blog that is maintained by the amazing Debbie Reese. Her site is full of highly useful information regarding children’s literature that is by or about American Indians. She started the blog in 2006 and since then has become a go-to source for many librarians and educators when it comes to the evaluation of books including American Indians (or representations of sovereign nations and peoples). Some highlights of the resources you will find while visiting AICL include: Best Books Native Writers, Illustrators, Scholars, Activists…on Twitter Revisions to Racism in Books Books that Reference Racist Classics Plus, I even made her blog back in 2013 thanks to Debbie video-chatting with our Tribal Libraries, Archives, and Museums (TLAM) class at the Information School @ the University of Wisconsin – Madison with the post, Indigenous Knowledge and Children’s Literature. Have a wonderful day and happy reading! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez