Citing Sources

This guide was created for the 4th grade team at Fairmont Elementary to be used in combination with the A+ source bookmarks and information literacy skills. 

When you’re doing research, the most important thing to do is to cite your sources! Citing your research is extremely important because it tells your reader how you learned what you now know and why your information is valid. Use this guide to learn how to cite your research.

First of all, is your source an A+ source? Is it:

  1. Authoritative
    1. Is there an author identified?
    2. What are the author’s qualifications?
    3. What type of site is it?
  2. Accurate
    1. Is the information current?
    2. Does it provide a balanced point of view?
    3. Does it match with other information you’ve read?
  3. Appropriate
    1. Can you read it?
    2. Does it fit your assignment?
    3. Does it answer your question(s)?

If your source is an A+ source, read it and then work on citing it. Keep a list of all the sources you’ve used so you don’t have to go back looking when it comes time to make your works cited page (also called a bibliography). Lastname and firstname always refer to the author’s first and last names. 

Databases

Lastname, Firstname. “Title.” Database Name. Publisher, copyright. Web. Date Month Year.

  • Example: “Flood.” World Book Kids. World Book, 2016. Web. 14 Jul. 2016.
  • Most likely this will be ready for your and you can just copy and paste however use the example above to cite from scratch!

Books

Lastname, Firstname. Title. Publisher, Copyright.

  • Example: Wheeler, Jill C. Joanne Simpson: Magnificent Meteorologist. ABDO, 2013.

Websites and Online Videos

Lastname, Firstname. “Title.” Website Name. Accessed Date Month Year. Web Address.

  • Example: KQED News. “Stormwatchers Predict Flooding.” PBS Learning Media. Accessed 30 Apr 2016. http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/kqedq11.sci.stormwatcherspredictflood/stormwatchers-predict-flooding/.

Lastly, you need to order your sources in alphabetical order and skip a line between each source. Always ask your teacher or librarian for assistance if you have questions that need clarification. 

Example of sources used above within one works cited page:

 

Works Cited

 “Flood.” World Book Kids. World Book, 2016. Web. 14 Jul. 2016.

KQED News. “Stormwatchers Predict Flooding.” PBS Learning Media. Accessed 30 Apr
2016. http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/kqedq11.sci.stormwatcherspredictflood/stormwatchers-predict-flooding/.

Wheeler, Jill C. Joanne Simpson: Magnificent Meteorologist. ABDO, 2013.

 

Further your learning:

Zotero is a great resource once you start doing more research and want a way to organize all of your information!

 

Teachers, looking for printouts and/or aids to assist your students in learning how to cite their sources? Check out Citing Sources K-6.

 
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This work by Katelyn Martens is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.