Winter Break Bingo!

Teachers, Librarians, & Administrators (of elementary students), Are you looking for a fun way to promote reading and writing this winter break? Check out: Winter Break Bingo Simply print, discuss, and pass out to your students. There is an optional second page with the prompt of “Draw a picture of yourself reading.” Encourage your students to complete as many boxes as they can and return it after winter break so they can share everything they were up to. If they need an incentive, go for it; and, if you’re looking for personalization, message me! Your librarian, Katelyn Martens-Rodriguez Per usual, this resource is also available on TeachersPayTeachers and please let me know how it went over!

Reading While White

Reading While White brings together allies for racial diversity and inclusion in books for children and teens online. Though I’m not currently a contributor to the site, I’m a regular follower and greatly appreciate the contributors for the sites existence. Their mission (as of this posting) is: We are White librarians organizing to confront racism in the field of children’s and young adult literature.  We are allies in the ongoing struggle for authenticity and visibility in books; for opportunities for people of color and First/Native Nations people in all aspects of the children’s and young adult book world; and for accountability among publishers, book creators, reviewers, librarians, teachers, and others.  We are learning, and hold ourselves responsible for understanding how our whiteness impacts our perspectives and our behavior. We know that we lack the expertise that non-white have on marginalized racial experiences.  We resolve to listen and learn from people of color and First/Native Nations people willing to speak about those experiences.  We resolve to examine our own White racial experiences without expecting people of color and First/Native Nations people to educate us. As White people, we have the responsibility to change the balance of White privilege. There are some […]

ReadyGen Support Materials

I was fortunate enough to be part of the team that assessed our options for new english language arts curriculums. ReadyGen, through Pearson, was the curriculum the team (and our administrators) decided to implement. This decision meant our classroom teachers were in for a leap from what they had become accustomed to. As with anything new, there was a great deal of work to be done within training and supporting our staff. While everyone is still working hard to make the necessary changes and find areas that need a few more resources, major strides have occurred. I wanted to share a few resources that support the learning of our 1st grade students: Arbor Day Cognate Memory Arbor Day Family Tree Bingo Please contact me if you’re interested in the creation of particular materials related to your curriculum(s) and/or grade levels. I enjoy creating fun, focused materials to support student learning. Your librarian, Katelyn

Anchor Charts and Graphic Organizers

Anchor charts and graphic organizers are commonly used items in most classrooms. Anchor charts are great ways to make thinking visible to record strategies, processes, cues, guidelines, and other aspects of the learning process. Graphic organizers are visual displays to depict the relationships between facts, terms, or ideas within a learning task. I’ve used a variety of resources to create charts and organizers for the educators I worked with. Several teachers also wanted 1/4 sheets for students to receive and paste into their notebooks. Is this something you prefer? All of them I’ve created are welcome for download and use from the following folder: Anchor Charts and Graphic Organizers What have you used and/or what are in you search of? Your librarian, Katelyn

Quality Resource: Lego Education

Lego Education is a great resource to satisfy your curricular needs. I have experience working with the Lego StoryStarter curriculum however based on how useful and well organized this kit was I would be inclined to think the others are the same. I would highly recommend to stick with their numbers of how many students per kit. I tried to stretch it and it did not work well. I stuck with smaller groups after that. I’m interested to try out the math curriculum they have available and pretty much anything else I can get supplies for. My favorite part about using legos is that is easily transfers learning to home. So many of my students love legos and love building. Doing activities in school allows them to replicate them at home with their own sets. I’m a proponent of anything that will get self-directed learning to occur with elementary through high school students. Check out Lego Education if you’re looking for new materials for your preschool through middle school students! Thanks for reading! Your librarian, Katelyn

Literacy and Legos: Changes and Future Plans

I’m always interested in trying new things while keeping what’s working. So is the case for Literacy and Legos. Year one and year two both taught me a lot about using the Lego StoryStarter curriculum. I’m very interested in continuing this at the next school I’m at. These lists are in no particular order. What works Groups of 2 or 3 students One StoryStarter kit per group Organizing the fairy tale expansion packs into the regular StoryStarter Kits. These provided much desired character traits. Having a fast warm-up activity to get student’s brains thinking before starting their main activity. The format of year one of working off of a book was a great way to focus on textual evidence and the structure of scenes. I would continue this as the basis for the beginning sessions. Blending students from different grade levels into the same group. Working with 3rd-5th grade students. Requiring a specific type of character, setting, or time period for an original story. This way two groups can focus their discussion and constructively assess one another’s stories. Eighteen students at a time. This allows for six groups of three, a manageable number for one person to be able to visit each of them […]